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Cookery Class News

Don’t want to be labelled obese? Obey the labels!

Having put together a nutritional diet for an ‘abs’ program, there’s little I don’t know about food labelling.  Much of that is thanks to the in-depth research necessary to turn the diet used as the basis for the program from the haute cuisine status it held, whilst delivering exactly the same results, into a Supermarket own-label branded diet (in the majority).

In fact, if you were to lay out the majority of everyday foods on a table, I’d be able to give you a rough approximation of the make up of each ingredient, fats, carbs, protein and any vitamin and/or mineral content, including sodium. Once you get to that stage, you begin to take it for granted that everyone else, similarly conscious of what they’re feeding their bodies (you so very are what you eat), at least shows a passing interest in what the packaging says about the food within. But apparently not.

That ever-popular editorial Agricultural Economics has recently issued this year’s results of the National Health Interview Survey in the US. It highlighted, for me, three main instances that could be directly addressed to tackle the epidemic of obesity spreading the globe (not to mention far too many waistlines), upon the crest of which rides the ever-growing problem of type two diabetes, even in younger adults.

The first, and for the woman looking for a quick fix to tackle their weight loss issues, is perhaps the one that is simplest to implement, is that women who don’t read food labels are an average 9lbs heavier than their content-querying counterparts. That’s like half a stone and then some!

Secondly, the annual study suggests that those who continued their education after compulsory schooling were more likely to consult the food labels than those who’d quit as soon as they were able.

And tertiary – portion control. Quite simply, if you don’t know how many calories, grams of saturated fat or nutritional content each meal contains, how on earth can you begin to serve up healthy options for you and your family?

All of this suggests that the education about food we receive falls way short and it’s often up to us as adults to go out into the world and learn even the basics of nutritional content that will help us live our lives to the full and engender our children to do the same.

There is plenty of further reading on here under the ‘healthy eating‘ tag, but why not do something about learning how to cook healthy and nutritious food yourself? We offer many regional cookery courses for you to compare. Check them out and see where you can get a hold of your nearest healthy-eating cookery class to kick-start your metabolism, hence your life. It is that serious.

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Cookery Class News

Katy Perry tweets to fans she’s taking up a cookery course

So even the superstars realise the importance of learning to cook. It seems that it doesn’t matter how many millions you have in the bank, possessing the ability to fend for oneself in the kitchen is paramount to self fulfilment.

The gorgeous Katy Perry is temporarily foregoing the limelight to start a new relationship with the kitchen. An announcement from the pop queen on twitter reveals that she is tempting to become “human” by enrolling herself in a cookery class.

Her fledgling attempts at culinary prowess may well be a sign that the 27 year old superstar is thinking of settling down. Reportedly dating John Mayer, a fellow top of the pops singer (that’s showing my age – c’mon, I could have said ‘The Tube’), this may be a sign that Katy is perhaps seeking domestic bliss.

It was only a short Tweet and did not divulge in which discipline the cookery course is aimed. This is not the first time that the chart-topping Perry has shown a public interest in cookery; earlier this year the ‘Teenage Dream’ singer invested a cool $50,000 for a one off cookery class with celebrity chef Cat Cora.

The huge sum was donated to Elton John and his AIDS foundation. The charity event, celebrating its 20th anniversary, saw Perry embroiled in a bidding war to court Cora’s culinary expertise, which she eventually won thanks to the massive bid.

The prize was, though, shared with big screen producer Steve Tisch. Maybe Perry’s thoughts, as she approaches her late twenties, are turning to quiet nights in with new beau, Mayer. It is perhaps a far cry from the wild, long hell-raising nights with ex husband Russell Brand.

No, I can’t work it out, either: what did she see in him in the first place and what on earth (that was nearly stronger) was he playing at fooling around with a woman like Perry sat at home?  If she ever decides to become a wandering chef and abandon the charts and stage forever, she can come and cook me up a dish any time she feels like it.  No doubt all the ladies are thinking the same thing about Brand, and who am I to argue the toss?

Who knows? We may well see Ms. Perry on BBC screens next year in the next series of Celebrity Master Chef. However, with no disrespect to “Peggy”, I cannot image Perry preparing scampi on the same workbench as Su Pollard.  Unless they called it the Peggy & Perry Cookery Show – now that would be full of hi-de-hi’s and low-de-lows, for sure.

But seriously, it just goes to show that even the most glamorous people on the planet appreciate the need to be able to cook for themselves. Perhaps if more celebrity icons got involved publicly with learning how to cook healthy and nutritious food from scratch, then more of our youngsters would follow suit.

Learning to cook from an early age is one of life’s essential lessons. Let’s hope the millions of Perry’s twitter fans take a leaf out of her cookery book, which I’m sure would also be a hit if she put her mind to collating what she has learnt in the kitchen, or intends to, into a glossy recipe book.

If you are anxious to teach your children to cook, there are plenty of cookery courses on our home page that will fulfill this need. Why not head on over there and compare our current offerings, hand-picked from the best on the net today? For many adolescents, learning their way around the kitchen professionally really would be a teenage dream come true.

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Cookery Class News

Is YouTube the future of adolescent cookery classes?

As parents, we bemoan the fact that our children never give us a helping hand around the kitchen. Then, as they pack their bags to go to university, we fear the worst and criticise ourselves for not endearing them with the culinary expertise that will see them through the next three years of their lives.

But it really is time to stop panicking – especially if the number of hits one budding young chef has had on his YouTube channel is anything to go by.

Ben Ebbrell is a 25 year old who has positioned himself online, along with three others who make up SortedFood.com, as the go-to chef for all of those students who need to know how to cook at university. To date, their video channel – an online cookery class for university students – has received a massive 13,000,000+ hits. Methinks there are more than just starving freshmen streaming the content, with figures like that.

The Telegraph’s Patrick Smith recently popped along in anticipation of SortedFood getting ready for the new term next month to run a few pointers past the chef to see if he could glean any knowledge to pass on to the students through their paper.

Based on the shooting-from-the-hip answers Ben gave, here are just a few cooking tips for university students to ensure that cooking is not only seen as less of a hassle, but also to demonstrate that confidence is the key to making a success of your fledgling hours in the kitchen.

Teamwork matters – although you may not want to be the first to admit it, many of your housemates are in the same boat. If you foul up with the flour or are pathetic with the pastry, make the mistake together to keep moral up and so that no one’s singled out to blame.

Follow the recipe – looking at a list of ingredients and a method in an ancient recipe book can often leave the student asking, “Say what???”. But some of these recipes are time-honoured; trust them, be confident and they’ll work out fine.

Looking for a cheap, easy meal? Stew or curry wins the vote for Ben. In such a dish, the meat is the meat, so it doesn’t have to be a choice cut. Stewing steak is perfect for both – just bung it in the pot with the rest of the ingredients, whack it in the oven nice and low and, hey presto! – one nutritious meal with all of the goodness kept in.

There is much more about there cookery classes on site, which has an online amazon shop for utensils and gadgets, a new recipe video every day and a huge, searchable archive for cheap and easy meals for a university student.

So, if you’re feeling bad about not having taught your offspring so much in the way of culinary expertise, simply send them on their way with a tablet device and a shortcut to SortedFood on their desktop. They’ll never be far away from someone from their own Generation Z, who is obviously far cooler than us parents in the kitchen and, more importantly, speaks their language, too…innit?

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cookerycourses.co.uk recipes Food and Ingredients

Celebrate National Cherry Day with a summer fruit crumble

Article original posted July 16th, but those nasty little gremlins pinched it.

While it’s still summer, and we’ve had a few cherries on top of the icing on the cake at the Olympics – six golds in one day, yesterday; stunning or what? – why not celebrate with this stunning recipe for fruit crumble, starring my favourite fruit of them all, the humble British cherry.

Today is National Cherry Day, did you know? No, I didn’t know we had one, either, but hey-ho, there you go. In order that no one’s opportunity passes by to pop their cherry dish into either a crumble, clafoutis or bun in the oven, we’re going to bring you the second in our series of recipes here on cookerycourses.co.uk.

There is the opportunity to make a clafoutis on the Great British Chefs blog, but as this website is aimed at those wanting to learn to cook, I’ve got a good idea that the majority of people picking up on this post, if they’re ought like me, couldn’t find their way to making a stimulating clafoutis even if they had a map. There is, however, another decent little recipe for a summer fruit crumble, the star ingredient of which is indeed the Great British cherry. Hurrah!

The good thing about this recipe is that for sweetness, it draws mainly on the natural sugars found within the fruits themselves, contains fibre in the oats and wholemeal flour, protein in the hazelnuts and Chia seeds contain even more omega-3 per gram than salmon.  What’s more, all of the fruits are blessed with their own antioxidant qualities, helping to rejuvenate your skin and lower your ldl cholesterol. Bonus! Combine all of that with the essential fatty acids (mono- and polyunsaturates) that feature more heavily than the saturates and you have to ask: who said desserts couldn’t be delicious yet also be healthy eating? What’s more, its sooo simple to make, it’s child’s play.

A dessert healthy, tasty and good for you? Get away!

So, herewith, the ingredients. For the fruits, we have 400gm of cherries, 125gm each of blueberries and raspberries and 200gm of strawberries. Remember to wash them all well. The cherries need to be stoned and, quartered, the strawberries sliced similarly. The raspberries are to be halved and the blueberries left whole. This will make the base, along with one teaspoon of chia seeds and 100ml of water.

For the crumble, a 100gm of each of the following: porridge oats, wholemeal flour (sieved to retain the bran – we don’t need that), hazelnuts (coarsely chopped in a food processor) and melted butter. Also, 75gm of brown sugar, ½ teaspoon of cinnamon and one teaspoon of chia seeds.

In an 11″ flan dish (approx.), layer the fruit, squishing it down gently until something like level, but not entirely spirit-level flat. Add the water and then sprinkle the teaspoon of chia seeds across the top.

Preheat the oven to Gas Mark 5 (190°c).

Everything else but the butter, tip into a mixing bowl. That’s the chopped hazelnuts, tsp of chia seeds, cinnamon, oats, sugar and flour. Mix together with hands, then pour over the melted butter. Grab yourself a wooden spoon and combine; you should have a mixture that looks like clusters, which you can then layer over the top of the fruit. Don’t worry if it doesn’t entirely cover the fruit – there should be chunks jutting through like a rocky desert landscape.

Place the flan dish on a baking tray in the middle of the preheated oven for about half an hour – the mixture should have begun to brown and the cherries and berries bubbling through the crumble by then – if not, leave a little while longer until they’ve done so.

The fruit will remain hot for some time, so be careful; custard is my fave with this dessert but you can temper the heat by serving it with ice-cream or – if you’re ultra-healthy – yoghurt will make a decent accompaniment, too.

So, now you can at least enjoy National Cherry Day, even if the summer has been a little bit of a let down, to date.

 

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cookerycourses.co.uk recipes News

The first recipe on cookery courses – pasta n peppers

As promised, today we experiment with a first for cookerycourses.co.uk – recipes! It seems strange that we write so much about the food industry, yet offer nothing in the way of healthy option eating. Or any type of cuisine you could just log on to our website and cook, for that matter.

Today, we’re going to start with a simple fusilli dish, which appeals to not only lovers of Italian food or those who like a quick snack with a bit of a bite, but also to vegetarians. In the same vein that Jermaine Jackson sang we don’t have to take our clothes off to have a good time, you don’t necessarily need to eat meat to have a good meal. My experience is that you are much more satisfied when you do indulge in both, but hey-ho, each to their own.

For basic ingredients you need two large peppers, red, yellow or green; you’ll find most supermarkets sell them in a traffic-light pack, one of each; if you’ve got a death-wish or cast iron stomach, you could even use all three. For oil, virgin olive oil is best (obviously taking Jermaine at his word), of which you’ll need one tbsp.

If you want to go posh, opt for a couple of shallots or one large onion if you’re you’re going the diner route – whichever way, they need to be finely chopped. A clove of garlic is best nutritionally, but a level teaspoon of garlic powder will do for the recipe just as well; likewise, a teaspoon dried chillies, crushed is preferred, but a good teaspoon of chilli powder will suffice.

I’m sure half of these online food stores print recipes that incorporate exotic ingredients just so that people will buy more of their range (and part with more of their cash); often, a common alternative is just as effective and has little or no effect on the outcome of the flavour of the dish.  Dare I say, even improves it, as our taste buds are more used to the common-or-garden ingredients.

100ml of vegetable stock is next, followed by 125gm of sun-dried tomatoes (for economy, these tend to be sold in 100gm containers, so a splodge (technical term) of tomato puree added will work out more cost effective. A couple of tablespoons of balsamic vinegar completes the mix, and then add the pasta of your choice – if we’re sticking to a fusilli dish, it had better be fusilli, but conchiglie is just as cool.

From thereon in, the method’s plain sailing. If you want the softish texture for the peppers, you can whack them in the oven on Gas Mark 8 for a half an hour and then peel the skin off when cooled or if you’re not that fussed, slice and dice into them into half-inch chunks and soften them in a frying pan with the oil, along with the shallots/onions as your first operation.

Pop a pan of water on for the pasta – at what point you put the fusilli/conchiglie in will depend upon what the instructions on the packet, but familiarise yourself with the rest of this recipe, liaise with the pasta instructions and coincide the two to finish simultaneously.

Once you’re happy with the texture of your vegetables, add the garlic and chilli with approximately a third of the stock and simmer for another five minutes. If you’ve roasted and peeled the peppers, now’s the time to put them in, as is it time for the sun-dried tomatoes and the balance of stock.

After they’ve been cooked for ten minutes, add the vinegar for about a minute, by which time it should all have reduced to a fine sauce mix.

If you’ve got it right, you can now drain the pasta and stir it in with the sauce mix and, hey-presto, you’re done in next to no time.

Based on sharing this meal between four, it will deliver approximately 500 calories, 12gm of sugars, less than 1gm of saturated from the 12gm of fat in all, which means there is plenty of good fats (mono- and poly-unsaturated) in there to help lower cholesterol and, despite popular misconception, increase your healthy fat intake, which is good for you!  And finally, a serving contains  only a quarter of a gram of salt, so is excellent for those conscious of healthy eating.

So there you go – our first recipe. Please, enjoy, share and give us some feedback. Happy days!

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Cookery Class

A cookery class involving Hens, Hen Parties, that is

Mm, okay. We can all see the novelty behind a Stag Do being held at a cookery school, but why on earth would a Hen Party want to be held there? Surely that’s a little bit like a busman’s holiday?

Back in the day, it would have been. The kitchen is no longer the providence of the fairer sex (to my wife, it is simply a galley through which she walks to get to the Jacuzzi) and women leaving home with an ingrained talent for making everything come alive on the work surface an in the oven is no longer the given it once was.

Indeed, such is the plight of many young couples leaving home clueless about how to work anything in the kitchen other than a kettle and a microwave (I had to show my nineteen year-old’s girlfriend how to use a manual tin-opener, last week, sheesh!), being unable to prepare and cook even the most basic of meals from scratch is one of the arguments behind the predictions of the experts who believe we will see a 50% rise in obesity by the time we reach the year 2030 in the UK.

But as well as a whole host of branded stores, cookery courses and government initiatives targeting the ‘eat/cook fresh’ market, there is also a great need for youngsters to even learn to cook at all.

I can think of no other reason why the online Stress-Free Hen Party planning website, Cambridge Hen Party, would offer a cookery class as part of its menu. Spa Days, Cocktail Making and even belly-dancing I can get to grips with, but a Cookery Class for a Hen Party?

There are three different types, Greek, Thai or Spanish and all are designed to offer buffet/feast style menus that, following complimentary drinks (no doubt not too many at this stage as there are hot and sharp elements to deal with in the kitchen itself), the chef walks up to twelve Hens through the preparation, the meal is then cooked in a state-of-the-art kitchen, before the party sits down to indulge in the fantastic meal that’s been co-created.

At a small additional cost, a recipe card as a souvenir can also be produced so that the meals learned to cook are not forgotten after the honeymoon.

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Kickin’ cookery courses happening in Brighton and Hove

It’s all happening – or has been happening – down on the south coast, particularly in the Brighton & Hove borough.

First and foremost, students at the City College were treated to an impromptu hands-on lesson with Norman Cook’s (a.k.a. FatBoy Slim) personal chef in the art of crew catering.

Then the cookerydoodledoo food craft and cookery school in Hove is going all Mexican on us, following on from the success of Cooking with Teenagers in May, where they now have a lasting homage to their smoky enchiladas with the recipe for all to see, eat and learn to cook themselves on their webpages.

The next Mexican cookery class at cookerydoodledoo is aimed at the younger age bracket, 3-10 year olds, and is scheduled for 23rd June. Prices for the first child is £12, which includes the cooking lesson itself and admittance for parents. Got two kids who you just can’t give to one without the other? That’s dandy, too, as you can add a second child on for a supplementary £3.

Lunch is also included, derived from what the mini-chefs cook up themselves. On the recipe card for the 23rd June cookery class is Guacamole, Quesidillas and a delve into two infamous Mexican ingredients that stand up well on their own or go perfectly together. No, not tequila and worms: chilli and chocolate!

DJ’s chef opens eyes of cookery students with hands-on gig

But back to the Brighton & Hove City College. The students just happened to be at the American Express Community Stadium learning their trade in the training college whilst FatBoy Slim was putting on a couple of gigs. Dan Stockland, the DJ’s personal chef and a classically qualified chef in his own rite, couldn’t resist dropping in for a walk down memory lane to his time as a cookery student.

But he did much more for the catering class than offer a bit of helpful advice. The four pupils who shone in the cookery classes were invited backstage to the kickin’ catering canteen of the roadies and crew, not just to get a visual on the opportunity but also to get stuck in with a bit of hands on cookery experience.

Jonathan File, a tutor at the training college, couldn’t praise the surprise turn of events enough, saying just how ‘personable and professional’ Dan himself was and what an ‘eye-opener’ it had been for his students to actually be involved in a real-life scenario backstage kitchen and just how stressful it can get.

Just one question: with a name like FatBoy Slim, just what does this DJ’s diet constitute? A bit of “Yo, yo!” and yo-yo, no doubt.

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Spice up Father’s Day with a cookery course

Are you struggling with what to get your dad for Father’s Day this year? Does he already have more pairs of socks than Marks and Spencer? Why not push the boat out with a little something different this year by sending your dad back to school? Cookery school, that is!

It’s true, the younger generation of men who are not getting married until their thirties or even forties and are flat-sharing because they can’t get a mortgage of their own have had to learn to cook for themselves, to a certain extent.  But for those dads who come from the previous generation, when a woman’s role was very definitely as the home maker whilst he went out and won the bread, have never actually had to  learn even the basics of cookery.

Let’s face it, if you were to buy your dad a set of cookery courses for Father’s Day, you wouldn’t half get yourself into your mom’s good books, too.  You may, however, want to take her to one side and reassure her that it’s not her cooking that’s the problem, just that you thought your dad’s gift would benefit you all.

We have plenty of choice on our cookery courses home page, but one cookery school, Mum’s Spaghetti, is offering a Dad’s only cookery class at a very reasonable rate, when you filter in the discount they’re offering.  And it’s staged on the 3rd of July, so your dad has plenty of time after the day itself to reschedule his calendar to fit the lesson in.

The aim is to provide a relaxed atmosphere for the dads (so that male pride doesn’t get in the way of the lessons) and, over the course of the three hours, provide instruction on the basic elements that go into making a meal. Or, as the case is in this class, a three course meal so that if your mum is delayed or treating herself to a bit of beauty therapy, dad can step in in the kitchen and you’ll be safe in the knowledge what he’ll prepare is at the very least edible.

Mum’s Spaghetti is in the heart of Staffordshire, too, beneath Lichfield Cathedral’s spires.  I have strolled along the main high street there more times than I care to remember so, if he puts up any resistance, you can always bribe him by offering to take him for a well earned beer in one of the many, many fine public houses that Lichfield City Centre has to offer.

If Staffordshire’s stretching the mileage a little, check out the courses we have on offer to find cookery classes near you.

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Infants and parents keen on cookery classes at Norfolk school

If there’s going to be a school curriculum that incorporates cookery classes for year one and two pupils, it wouldn’t surprise you to hear that the school is based in Delia Smith’s neck of the woods in Norfolk.

In an age where many young families have literally no idea how to cook from fresh ingredients after a generation has been subjected to ‘healthy’ ready meals, this can only be good news for the future of the country. And that’s not being over dramatic; obesity in the young and ignorance of culinary and nutritional values is a a growing problem that, if not addressed now, will have serious implications for future generations.

So why has this school, namely Costessey Infant School, accepted the gauntlet of allowing youngsters into the kitchen, then additionally inviting the parents along afterwards to sample what their little darlings have learnt in the cookery classes?

Let’s Get Cooking Lottery funding kick-started the project

Wednesday mornings at the school have never been the same since, in 2008, the school accepted National Lottery funding as part of the “Let’s Get Cooking” project in an attempt to correct the well-publicised deviance from the straight and narrow of children’s diets. But it’s not only the youngsters at school who benefit from the cookery courses.

According to head teacher Rosemary Kett, the cooking lessons undertaken by the pupils have a knock-on effect upon the parents, who may or may not fall into the category as outlined above. And it seems to be having the desired effect. The school also runs cookery classes after school hours, which are equally as popular and places are filled very quickly. As no one likes remembering what they learn at school, Costessey has also got its own cook book featuring many of the recipes that make up the cookery classes.

Over the four years that the classes have been running, hundreds of pupils have benefited from the experience of Mrs Kett and volunteers like Jill Lamb who regularly help out, indeed, like a lamb to the slaughter one would think. But not so.

As well as learning the basics of cooking and table manners it would appear that the lessons learnt are carried forth into junior school, too. Last year, Costessey Juniors won the Norfolk Healthy Schools award before this year achieving the national standard of the same accolade. Indeed, even if parents are unsure of what constitutes a healthy packed lunch, there are links to such information on their website, namely www.eatwell.gov.uk and www.food.gov.uk.

As all the above parties involved from Colman’s country are eager to make healthy eating such a large part of growing up, I suppose you could say they’re as keen as mustard. Mmm, let’s hope my webmaster doesn’t send me a dijon letter after that little classic, eh?

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Marco Pierre White sets out on Knorr-tical world cruise

We have written before about Marco Pierre White and his amazing rise to fame as a teenager, through to his hands-on apprenticeship to the renowned chef we know and love from the reality cooking shows such as Hell’s Kitchen and The Chopping Board to Australian Masterchef, whereupon he set his own challenge.

The fifty-year-old chef, more recently prominent on our screens promoting Knorr stock cubes, is to go on a world tour giving cookery courses on the same, teaching budding chefs across the planet how to integrate them into their own recipes.

The father of four, who famously renounced his three Michelin-star awards when he gave up the nitty-gritty of cookery in the very practical sense as a restaurateur – despite being the youngest ever chef to get a hat-trick of said awards – jets off to Singapore for the first three day stint. The trip will serve a dual purpose: promoting the stock cubes and unveiling the brand new Chefmanship Centre, brought to us by Unilever Food Solutions’.

From there, he will also be appearing at the World Gourmet Summit where he will be giving live cookery demonstrations using the stock cubes as the base of his own recipes. It really should be a treat as Pierre White will also be including in the live cookery class how other herbs and spices can be used to compliment or counteract the tantalising tastes that the Knorr cubes and cooking sauces deliver.

Be inventive and creative in the kitchen to create your signature dish

This is a theory that the young Michelin man thinks sets good chefs apart; having had such successes in the past, who are we to argue? He truly believes that chefs need to get ‘inventive and creative’ in the kitchen to give their dishes that distinct signature that sets them apart, yet hold on to the nature of the meal they are preparing without compromising their own precarious position when meddling with the classics, especially if things go horribly wrong.

It’s for this reason cookery courses are so important – you may think you have a dish licked, but without advise of experience, how do you know if you’ve been successful?  Well, apart from licked dishes, of course.

Someone else who has enjoyed success thanks to Knorr is Peter Joyner, Elior UK’s food development director. He recently came first from five in the UK division of Knorr’s recipe competition, Blue Dragon. His experience in the Far East will be altogether different as, rather than host the cookery courses, he will be a student in Bangkok and Phuket (hard life these chefs have got) as he travels to Thailand next month to indulge of masterclasses of the highest order to help develop his own culinary prowess.

Pierre White will return to Australia after his jaunt to MasterChef last year, but this time his sole intention is to continue to promote the Knorr stock cubes and not, this time, to see what the best chefs from down under can do for one of his cooking lesson challenges.

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